Art.work

Anthi Evangelou is a Cypriot/Swiss artist born and raised in Cyprus. 

Anthi has recently graduated from Kingston University, London (2014) with a first degree honours and is currently undertaking an online masters program in Fine Art Digital, in the University of the Arts, London. Meanwhile, Anthi is doing her internship experience in Pafos 2017 (European Capital of Culture in 2017).Anthi Evangelou
In the previous months, Anthi has been assisted tutor assistant at the University of the Art, (Foundation Level) and later became part of the curating team of ‘The Lumen Prize’ exhibition at the Crypt Gallery in St.Pancras, London (2015). Anthi was also one of the two curators of the ‘Digital Meze’ exhibition at Gitton Gallery in Bethnal Green, London (2015).

In the past, she has participated in exhibitions in both Cyprus and UK in a variety of commercial, public and artistic spaces. She participated in the Exhibition Dis-Located at Neme Center of Contemporary Art, Appareo – Electric House, an exhibition which took place at the American Square in London (2013) and also in the ‘She is’ Exhibition (Women Aid Fundraiser) in London (2013).

Furthermore, Anthi has participated in a fine art exhibition organized by Cyprus Frindge in the ‘House of literature (2013) and in the exhibition led by the Photographic Society of Paphos, at the Palia Ιlectriki House (2014) which took place after the ending of the photographic contest, where the artist was awarded with an ‘Honorable mention’.

About her work

By rethinking and reconstructing the body’s restrictions Anthi results in creating surreal and unearthly positions that therefore, challenge the perceptions of the real. What one is presen

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ted with, are depersonalized and uncommon forms that are no longer reminiscent of the human body itself, in other words the work demonstrates photographic fragmentations of the human body. Paying attention to the outline, shape and the details of the body revealed by lighting and shadows, the artist increases or decreases the volume of abstraction and the merging of the body in the environment situated.

Intentionally hiding her face and limbs from being photographed, the body ends up looking like a ‘torso’. This seems to critique the tradition of sculpture, while it references the way in which the body is objectified and turned into an object, in an attempt to construct figurative sculpture. These bits adopt a new meaning and substance and therefore exist apart from the whole to which they belonged.

We often come across busts without heads, hands and feet when studying the practice of sculpture making or in our first steps in figurative drawing. In addition, the work also references the art of antiquity .The body depicted becomes the tool and yet the fundamental material for the sculpture is simultaneously transformed into a sculpture itself, one of dismembered fragments.

The work studies the way in which the human body is represented in relation to its surroundings. By intersecting self-exposure and performance, the photograph adopts a performative character.

However the performance exists solely for the photograph.The event itself is reduced and presented into single photographs that capture the ‘peak’ of the moment.These transformative and ambiguous fragmentations allow the viewer to utterly interpret it, in order to evoke some other order of being.

The spaces at which the photographs are taken vary from domestic to exterior environments as well as studio spaces. Her body is either ‘merged’ with its surroundings environment or it is ‘entangled’ with objects that are found within those spaces. There seems to be a mutual supplementation and interaction of body and environment.

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